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Macular Degeneration Video

Description: Animation of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). AMD is a vision problem of the retina or light sensitive layer of the eye in older individuals. Yellowish deposits (drusen) form, resulting in distortion and gradual blurring of vision. In advanced cases, blind spots develop that grow larger as the disease progresses. There are two types of AMD, classified as "wet" and "dry." The most common form is the dry type. Wet AMD, as seen in the animation, occurs when blood vessels growing up from beneath the retina leak blood. Leaked blood pushes on the light receptor cells resulting in damage to the retina.

Video Caption(Video only; no audio.) Children are playing in a play lot. As the video progresses, the children are distorted and the bright colors and strong contrast in the children's clothes fade becoming less focused. In this simulation, how a person with AMD sees the world is presented graphically. As the disease progresses the area of central vision deteriorates. The gradual destruction of light sensitive cells continues until large areas are totally lost. Peripheral vision remains, but the ability to clearly see straight ahead is gradually lost.

Credit: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

Click on the link below to access the video:

http://www.nei.nih.gov/photo/eyedis/VA05.mov

Macular Degeneration Video

Description: Video illustration of changes in the eye associated with AMD. Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in older Americans. It affects the retina, the light sensitive layer of the eye. As yellowish deposits form under the retina, they can result in distortion and gradual blurring of vision. This is called "dry AMD." The second type, called "wet AMD" can lead to bleeding and more rapid vision loss. The most common form is the dry type, but as more and larger deposits develop under the retina, the risk of developing the wet type increases.

Video Caption: (Video only; no audio.) The animation begins with a close-up of the face of an elderly woman. The face fades as the camera begins to zoom in on her right eye. The zoom continues and as the eye fills the screen, the front half disappears to reveal the light sensitive retinal layer at the back of the eye. Small yellowish deposits known as drusen are seen forming under the retina blurring the sharp central area of vision or macula. Individual drusen, coalesce forming larger areas of damage. Blood vessels growing up from below the retina leak blood under the retina. Pressure from these pockets of blood, damage the light sensing cells, destroying the ability to see straight ahead.
Credit: National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health

Click on the link below to access the video:

http://www.nei.nih.gov/photo/eyedis/VA03.mov